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The Merging of Beauty, Health, Wellbeing and Fitness

This week was World Mental Health Day and aptly enough I was contacted by a market research organisation in the US who interviewed me to contribute towards a publication they were writing about wellness, and how vitamins and supplements are being repositioned as a means to supplementing our beauty regime, from better sleep to stronger nails, to glossier hair and brighter skin.

It got me thinking about how we approach wellness, and how much more thought we give to this. It’s ironic when you think that we are living in a world that keeps us busier than ever before, so much so that we feel the need to switch off and detox from social media, from processed foods, from too much alcohol. With information being readily available across the internet we as consumers have come to understand that beauty is more than skin deep, and the manner in which we expose our skin to environmental factors and what we consume has long-term effects on the way we look and feel.

The rise of social media, and platforms like Instagram and Facebook are inundated with images and videos of how celebrities and influencers are sculpting their bodies and achieving glowing skin and glossy hair through diet, supplements and exercise inspiring others to do the same.  We have become far more aware of how skincare products work, that in order to achieve healthy skin we need to take care of ourselves internally and externally. We understand the benefits of ingesting a supplement, and how this can improve our skin from the inside rather than just applying products topically to our skin.

 

Does explaining the benefits of vitamins to beauty help consumers take vitamins more seriously?

There is a lot more transparency across the industry with regards to the benefits of skincare ingredients, what ingredients skincare brands include in their products, and a focus on ‘clean beauty’. People want to know what is put into the products we apply to our skin, and where this is sourced from and whether the ingredients have been ethically sourced and sustainably produced. This has far reaching implications across the beauty industry, as well as with regards to food and supplements.

Achieving beauty from within is not a new concept. In certain cultures, for example Asia, and in particular Japan, nutricosmetics have been extremely popular with collagen being added to biscuits, coffee, teas and water for years.

In previous years there has been a lot of controversy surrounding the benefits of taking a daily multi-vitamin. More recently the focus has been on how specific vitamins or minerals can provide crucial benefits to the condition of your skin, nails, hair and the quality of your sleep.

 

It is not just about vanity, but also about how we have become more interested in understanding the direct benefits of what we consume. We understand that our diet is very closely linked to the way we look and feel, both veganism and gut health are areas that are becoming more focal. We understand that our daily diets might not provide us with all the essential vitamins and minerals we need.

 

 

Greater accessibility to information, the rise of social media inspiring people to look and to feel good and the merging of the health, beauty and wellbeing sectors has led to the rise of a number of ‘beauty from within’ brands.

This has become a lot more popular as a result of a combination of these factors coming together at the same time. There is more information available now than ever before on the benefits of adopting a healthy lifestyle, daily fitness, meditation, mindset as well as on following a more personalised beauty regime. It is no longer a ‘one size fits all’ but about how we are individuals, who need to take a personalised approach to our health, beauty and wellbeing.

Borrowing creative licence from the sitcom ‘Frasier’ I wish you all good mental health.

Janet